Working Solo vs. Together: Why the Latter Rules

wedding photographers PortsmouthEven when we work in the same field, each of us has different ways of working. We have our own styles and techniques. James White Photography is an example among wedding photographers Portsmouth who works alone.

There are people who’ll say that they work better when they’re alone; they know their own schedule, where to stand when working, and won’t overlap themselves. So, is there really an up to working duo like how some wedding photographers Portsmouth do?

There’s only so much a single person can do

As a photographer, you may be able to call yourself a professional that knows what you are doing and where you should go. You know exactly how to position yourself. Those are all possible by a single photographer, but there are just things impossible to do no matter how good you are.

During the dress up session, you cannot be in two rooms at once. One of them have to wait or you’ll only have pictures of the bride’s. During the ceremony, you also have to move around a lot as you need to take pictures of the groom waiting and the bride walking down the aisle. There are also emotional guests you need to take pictures of and, let’s admit it, we miss some of them. Sometimes, we don’t even know what we missed.

If quality is your priority…

Our job as wedding photographers Portsmouth may be the same: to take pictures of the wedding event. But our approach can be different. Some photographers prioritize the number of pictures they can take. While more professional ones will prioritize quality and precious moments to be captured.

If the latter is you than a second photographer is a great idea. Why? One more photographer can add up the total amount of pictures and seem to be more fitting to the first type of photographer. However, there’s no point in taking the exact same pictures and discarding them during post-production. It’s simply counterproductive.

Variety and complicity

Most wedding photographer takes ceremony pictures from one popular point of view. But that’s it. Your wedding photographer cannot rush to the second point (which means running across the hall as everybody’s eyes on him) and take the pictures.

This is just for one case. There are a lot of cases in wedding photography where the anadditional shooter can give so much variety and spices to the wedding pictures. This is so much more meaningful than simply taking more pictures without any purpose. Of course, a proper coordination and discussion have to be done before commencing on the job.

Time-saving

Remember the dress up the case? One shooter can only shoot in one place. But another shooter will speed up the process so much faster. Imagine if the bride is going to get ready at her grandma’s house and the groom is getting ready at the hotel. How many hours are wasted by the groom as he has to wait for bride’s session to finish?

Get someone of your caliber

All these great benefits can only be enjoyed if you get yourself the right person to do it. Someone reliable, talented, and ready to learn if he/she is still a beginner. Maintain quality and assure your clients that you are both professional and better, tell them the great things about what two wedding photographers can do.

Portrait Photography: Aperture, Exposure, Autofocus, Expression, and Flash

portrait photographyThese are the five things that we will cover in this article. Often than not, when doing portrait photography, one just need an article that will help to kick-start the picture-taking. There’s no need to discuss in depth on the type of lenses and cameras that are going to cost you a fortune. What you need right now is to learn the technique and make sure that you are able to enjoy the activity.

Of course, you still need a camera and the lens

It’s mandatory. At least a good body camera with a good sensor and a reliable zoom lens (prime lens is also great if it fits you). Make sure that you are comfortable with zooming and out and familiar with the settings of your camera.

1. Exposure

With exposure setting, you’ll be able to override the brightness and the amount of light your camera is receiving. Although it automatically decides how much light should get in and how ‘bright’ the pictures should look like, it takes into consideration the majority of the frame.

An example is when you want to shoot something against the sun or bright background, subjects in front of it will go dark. With a DSLR camera, you can set the exposure to +1 to increase the brightness of the pictures, or higher as you need it to be.

2. Aperture

If your subject is facing straight at you, the narrow aperture is a good choice to get that nice bokeh of the background. But in portrait, always remember that you also take different angles of your subject’s face, which means there’s also a side look and narrow aperture will make the pictures turn out weird.

Use a wide aperture to prevent blurring one side of the face and to get a clear, crisp shot of your client.

3. Autofocus

Portrait photography means working with your client in close-range. This makes focusing a very important part of the job. Don’t focus on the wrong spot of the face; focus on the forehead, and you’ll blue the nose, focus on the nose, and you’ll blur the eyes.

Pinpoint single AF focus on the eye, half press the shutter and reposition yourself to finish the shot.

4. Expression

No matter how good you are at taking pictures, what really matters the most is the subject you are shooting. Working as a portrait photographer means that you will be meeting people for the first time and you need to them to own the camera. They have to be able to express themselves.

Not all people like being in front of a camera, admit that. Which means that you need to make them at least feel comfortable in front of you. Building rapport is an important part of the job. Break the ice and make the session enjoyable is the trick. Ask general questions and talk about things like friends. Your client won’t be too hesitant in posing and acting in front of you anymore!

5. Flash and reflectors

There are lots of functions you can use flash for. Not just lighting up the dark, fill flash is also a technique that you use when shadows are formed on the face of the subject. This is usually done when the sun is shining too bright and creates silhouettes, or when the weather is not bright enough to light up the client.

Reflectors are another great thing. By reflecting the sunlight back to the face of the client, you’ll get natural light without having to flash annoyingly on the client.